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January 17, 2013

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Brilliant stuff, thank you.

I've been wrestling with a similar thought for a while now (do the right thing, not the quick thing - because otherwise you just end up making more work for yourself) and you've demonstrated that we all need to ask 'why' a few more times in the process, rather than just fixing the problem when it pops up.

You are very kind, hope life at Home is treating you well

Yup :) although pinching myself when I realise it's been a full year - and longer since the last s'up north... we should all probably do something about that.

The power of negative thinking. It's very hard to make people change their behaviour, but it's much easier to ask why they're not doing what we want them to do and then remove those obstacles.

Bloddy brilliant business solution. It does gets you thinking about what is the job about and what people want you do... sometimes, as someone told me, planners handle the powerpoint because the suits just don't feel like doing it.
BTW, loved the King's reference to ad-tweaking.

PD: After How Brands Grow and Seducing the Subconscious I feel I cannot read any marketing book at all without feeling the confirmation bias in my face. Now what? Should we go to JSTOR and read the journals?

Oh yes, most suits just want us to make their jobs easier.
I think that's a goof shout about confirmation bias, the worst thing one could do is to settle into obstinacy about Ehrenberg Bass etc. The only way I know is to question everything.

I think the theorical framework created by Ehrenberg-Bass is a solid starting point to develop marketing strategy.
You're right about questioning everything but I don't think that working under unproven assumptions about how people process ads and behaves is a good use of resources. Settling into obstinacy about anything is a bad idea but working under assumptions that have been proven empirically doesn't sound a crazy thing to do.

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